Categories
photo stuff reflections

Back at it.

Bam! Pow! Shazaam!  Finally, a powerful week!  I biked.  I worked out.  Played racquetball.  Chopped wood!  It was awesome.  If you’ve ever had a couple of weeks in a row where everything seemed too much, you can appreciate how wonderful this week has been.  I tried to capture what it was like to struggle through the day in the picture below.  The colors of fall bleed through the image and the textures and overlays let the weight of the world lead in to my eyes.  Delicious.  Of course, I made it during the awesome week — when I had the energy and will to experiment!  There’s a certain irony there we should enjoy.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Photo by Myriam.
Categories
Uncategorized

Facing the Light

Hurricane Sandy cut power to Main street in Hastings for a week, leaving our bike shop closed and dark.  After a few days of inactivity, the manager sent out an email, saying that they would open the shop during daylight.  The mechanic, Bob Flint, would move his workstand to the plate glass windows in front and try to help anyone who needed it.  James, the store clerk, was ready to help people accessorize, while the manager, Stan Avedon, was going to hold the morning ride and then come back to the store.

I loved it.

Too many days of hauling debris while I wondered when the schools would re-open.  The idea that the bike shop would open — even without power — meant that the lighter side of life was ready to return.  My wife and I hauled our daughter and a friend out to the trails to make sure they were clear, but we stopped by the bike shop to make sure they had  a few friendly faces to chat with in the dark.  I took a quick portrait of each one to post here.  It’s my way of saying thank you to them for boldly saying that cycling is a part of life and has to transcend storm and mishap.  Here are the bike shop guys from Hastings Velo…and a recipe for cocoa that’s passably similar to what I brought them that afternoon.

Categories
photo stuff

Family Trail Work

The Parks department came through and cut up all the big logs.  We went up a few miles from Hastings to make sure that everything was clear enough for joggers and cyclists.  Half the town is without power, but schools will re-open tomorrow and the delis on the main drag have been using extension cords from their neighbors to keep the coffee flowing and the milk cold.  I figured that we need some of the things that bring normalcy — and peace — to our lives so I invited my wife and daughter to come out with me and help make sure that the trails were clear.  My daughter, Lia, brought her friend, Izzy and we topped off the air in the tires and ventured out.  It was crisp outside, but I could feel anxiety stripped away by the mere act of moving.  Alas, the day was not without incident — Lia ripped her heel on the big ring dismounting.  She soldiered on as crimson soaked into her sock and shoe.  It will be back to classes and homework soon enough.